5G in 2021: Expectations and Evolution Samsung Predictions

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5G is the fastest-growing mobile technology in history and is being adopted four times as quickly as LTE was when it was introduced, as 5G Americas observed in a new report. For impatient customers, 5G and the new applications it will power cannot come to their neighborhood fast enough. In reality, 5G networks and devices are proliferating at a far faster rate than 4G LTE did at the same relative time in its development.

Consider this brief history: 5G networks began to launch around the world in 2019. 2020 has seen the deployment of nationwide 5G networks by U.S. operators (200m covered pops), the proliferation of 5G-capable flagship devices and the emergence of early 5G use cases. Comparatively, LTE networks first launched in the 2009-2010 timeframe in the U.S., ultimately fueling the rapid growth that peaked about 5 years ago in social media use via mobile devices and the development of new, society-shifting applications such as ride-sharing services like Uber, which launched in 2009 and hit their first billion trips in 2015.

Samsung expects that 2021 will see strong movement toward Standalone 5G networks and further development of the 5G ecosystem, including applications that will more fully utilize 5G’s transformational possibilities. In the coming year, one of the most crucial factors in 5G application development will be the type of spectrum available in each country. In order to have a network that achieves the full potential of 5G, you need to have the right balance of sub-1 GHz, low-band spectrum for mass coverage; mid-band spectrum between 1-6 GHz for a mix of capacity and coverage; and high-band or millimeter wave spectrum for low latency and blazing-fast speeds. To address the wide range of 5G use cases and applications across consumer and business segments, a combination of all three spectrum types, and network architecture enhancements like edge computing resources, are crucial. Here in the U.S., the conclusion of the ongoing C-band auction will provide that critical path to providing more mid-band spectrum for U.S. operators.

5G is the fastest-growing mobile technology in history and is being adopted four times as quickly as LTE was when it was introduced, as 5G Americas observed in a new report. For impatient customers, 5G and the new applications it will power cannot come to their neighborhood fast enough. In reality, 5G networks and devices are proliferating at a far faster rate than 4G LTE did at the same relative time in its development.

Consider this brief history: 5G networks began to launch around the world in 2019. 2020 has seen the deployment of nationwide 5G networks by U.S. operators (200m covered pops), the proliferation of 5G-capable flagship devices and the emergence of early 5G use cases. Comparatively, LTE networks first launched in the 2009-2010 timeframe in the U.S., ultimately fueling the rapid growth that peaked about 5 years ago in social media use via mobile devices and the development of new, society-shifting applications such as ride-sharing services like Uber, which launched in 2009 and hit their first billion trips in 2015.

Samsung expects that 2021 will see strong movement toward Standalone 5G networks and further development of the 5G ecosystem, including applications that will more fully utilize 5G’s transformational possibilities. In the coming year, one of the most crucial factors in 5G application development will be the type of spectrum available in each country. In order to have a network that achieves the full potential of 5G, you need to have the right balance of sub-1 GHz, low-band spectrum for mass coverage; mid-band spectrum between 1-6 GHz for a mix of capacity and coverage; and high-band or millimeter wave spectrum for low latency and blazing-fast speeds. To address the wide range of 5G use cases and applications across consumer and business segments, a combination of all three spectrum types, and network architecture enhancements like edge computing resources, are crucial. Here in the U.S., the conclusion of the ongoing C-band auction will provide that critical path to providing more mid-band spectrum for U.S. operators.

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