How to Stop Shadow IT, Manage Access and Ensure Security with Cloud Applications | Webroot

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Today, the average enterprise uses over 2000 cloud applications and services, and we expect this number will continue to grow as more businesses realize the efficiency, flexibility and collaboration benefits these services bring. But the use of cloud-based applications also comes with a few caveats; for example, the apps themselves may pose potential security vulnerabilities, and it’s also hard to prevent employees from using unsanctioned applications outside of the approved list (aka “shadow IT”), meaning critical business data could be floating out there in the ether without proper encryption or access controls.

When implementing these types of solutions, security should be a central concern in the vetting process. Unfortunately, it isn’t.

A full 92% of enterprises admit they have a gap between current and planned cloud usage and the maturity of their cloud security program. Meanwhile, 63% of web-borne malware and 15% of phishing attacks are delivered over cloud applications. And although 84% of organizations report using SaaS services at their company, more than 93% of those said they still deal with unsanctioned cloud app usage.

Even though cloud transformation is a strategic focus for many businesses, CISOs and IT teams are often left out of the discussion. That may be because the adoption of cloud services is generally billed as quick and easy with a rapid time to value, while IT security vetting processes don’t typically boast the same reputation. That often means that, for reasons of speed and perception, security may be treated as an afterthought — which is a potentially devastating oversight.

As adoption continues to grow, it’s critical for enterprises and small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) alike to balance their cloud application use with security and access control; otherwise, the benefits they see may quickly turn into regulatory compliance nightmares, data loss disasters and security breaches.

To improve visibility into the cloud applications being used, and to create usage policies and address security risks, many businesses are turning to Cloud Access Security Brokers (CASBs). CASB services are typically placed between the businesses who consume cloud services and providers who offer them, effectively protecting the gateway between a company’s on-premises IT infrastructure and the cloud service provider’s infrastructure. As such, CASBs can provide a central location for policy and governance simultaneously across multiple cloud services — for users and devices — and granular visibility into and control over user activities and sensitive data. They typically help enforce data-centric security policies based on data classification, data discovery and user activity surrounding data.

Faced with a continually growing and changing number of cloud applications and services, it’s critical to have accurate, up-to-date cloud-specific intelligence, not only for CASBs but also other security tool providers who provide support and policy control capabilities around cloud applications.

To better enable CASBs and security device vendors to identify and categorize cloud applications Webroot recently released its newest service: Webroot BrightCloud® Cloud Service Intelligence. This service is designed to offer full visibility, ensure security, enforce compliance, and identify shadow IT through three components: Cloud Application Classification, Cloud Application Function, and Cloud Application Reputation.

By embedding these components into a CASB solution or other security device, partners can identify a given cloud application, classify it by purpose, and control access to it based on the application’s group, name, and the action being performed. Additionally, customers can assess risk and compliance for all cloud applications with a reputation score. Cloud Service Intelligence can also be layered with other BrightCloud® services, such as Web Classification and Web Reputation, for a complete filtering solution that won’t impact product or network bandwidth.

The use of cloud applications is only going to continue to grow. Actionable threat intelligence can provide critical data around which cloud applications are being used within an organization, how they are being used, and what their security reputations may be. Armed with this kind of visibility and security information, enterprises, businesses, and the CASB and security providers who serve them can reduce risk and minimize shadow IT for a stronger overall cyber resilience posture. Learn more about this new service and its applications in our datasheet.

Cathy Yang

About the Author

Cathy Yang

Product Manager, Threat Intelligence

As product manager for Webroot’s threat intelligence solutions, Cathy Yang drives excellence in the quality of data and services for technology partners.

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